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"Voices at the Window" by Sir Philip Sidney [poem analysis]

on Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:16 pm
VOICES AT THE WINDOW
by: Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)

Who is it that, this dark night,
Underneath my window plaineth?

It is one who from thy sight
Being, ah, exiled, disdaineth
Every other vulgar light.

Why, alas, and are you he?
Be not yet those fancies changèd?

Dear, when you find change in me,
Though from me you be estrangèd,
Let my change to ruin be.

Well, in absence this will die:
Leave to see, and leave to wonder.

Absence sure will help, if I
Can learn how myself to sunder
From what in my heart doth lie.

But time will these thoughts remove;
Time doth work what no man knoweth.

Time doth as the subject prove:
What time still the affection groweth
In the faithful turtle-dove.

What if you new beauties see?
Will not they stir new affection?

I will think they pictures be
(Image-like, of saint's perfection)
Poorly counterfeiting thee.

But your reason's purest light
Bids you leave such minds to nourish.

Dear, do reason no such spite!
Never doth thy beauty flourish
More than in my reason's sight.

_________________
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Date d'inscription : 2011-02-18
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Re: "Voices at the Window" by Sir Philip Sidney [poem analysis]

on Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:35 pm
Ah, man. There too much archaic words. F*** ya!


Vulgar (adj):
1 lacking sophistication or good taste.
2 making explicit and offensive reference to sex or bodily functions; coarse and rude.
3 dated characteristic of or belonging to ordinary people.

Alas (exclamation) (archaic or humorous): used to express grief, pity, or concern.

Sunder (v): split apart.

Turtle-dove (n): a small Old World dove with a soft purring call , noted for the apparent affection shown for its mate. [here I have a picture of this bird]
Spoiler:
Counterfeiting (v): imitate fraudulently.

Bids (v): command or order (someone) to do something.
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Date d'inscription : 2010-08-30
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Re: "Voices at the Window" by Sir Philip Sidney [poem analysis]

on Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:43 pm
Plaineth: plained (archaic), meaning complained.

Disdaineth: disdained
1. To regard or treat with haughty contempt; despise. See Synonyms at despise.
2. To consider or reject as beneath oneself.

Changèd: changed

Estrangèd: estranged

Doth: did

Knoweth: knew

Groweth: grew

Thee: you (objective)

Notice that verbs end with "th" is for 3rd person. The è is just to stress make readers to stress more on the "ed".
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Date d'inscription : 2011-02-16
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Re: "Voices at the Window" by Sir Philip Sidney [poem analysis]

on Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:52 pm
damn, There are no stuff on this poem. Except this :
Spoiler:
The Poem Voices at the Window by Sir Philip Sydney - Example of English Poetry
Poetry written such as the poem Voices at the Window by Sir Philip Sydney is piece of literature written by a English poet in meter or verse expressing various emotions which are expressed by the use of variety of techniques including metaphors, similes and onomatopoeia. The emphasis on the aesthetics of language and the use of techniques such as repetition, meter and rhyme are what are commonly used to distinguish English poetry from English prose. Poems often make heavy use of imagery and word association to quickly convey emotions. A famous example of English poetry is the poem Voices at the Window by Sir Philip Sydney.

The Poem Voices at the Window by Sir Philip Sydney - Example of Structure of English Poetry
The structure used in an English poem varies with different types of poetry and can be seen in the above example of the poem Voices at the Window by Sir Philip Sydney. The structural elements might include the line, couplet, strophe and stanza. Poets and English Poetry combine the use of language and a specific structure to create an imaginative and expressive poem such as Voices at the Window by Sir Philip Sydney . The structure used in some Poetry types are also used when considering the visual effect of a finished poem.
http://www.types-of-poetry.org.uk/english-poetry/43-voices-at-the-window-by-sir-philip-sydney.htm
You're sure you guys want to analysis this poem?
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Re: "Voices at the Window" by Sir Philip Sidney [poem analysis]

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